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Please Note: Not all of the objects on this website are on display at the museum.

Image of WW1 SPLATTER OR TANK CHAIN MAIL MASK

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WW1 SPLATTER OR TANK CHAIN MAIL MASK

Protective mask used in tanks. The tank crews used many purpose built and adapted items of head gear to protect themselves from splinters of hot metal becoming detached from the tank by shells. It is made of steel reinforced leather and fine chain mail, with slits for the eyes.

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A0815

Image of WW1 BRITISH AMMUNITION BELTS

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WW1 BRITISH AMMUNITION BELTS

Ammunition belts worn during the Boer War period and continuing until the new webbing systems came in around 1908.

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A0525

Image of WIRE CUTTERS WW1 TYPE

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WIRE CUTTERS WW1 TYPE

Wire Cutters used for removing barbed wire usually in trench warfare, this design was identical to that used during WW1. During WW2 trench warfare was not so common, but soldiers were still issued with them, just in case.

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A1544

Image of WWII WIRE CUTTERS, 1940

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WWII WIRE CUTTERS, 1940

Wire Cutters used for removing barbed wire usually in trench warfare, this design was identical to that used during WW1.
During WW2 trench warfare was not so common, but soldiers were still issued with them, just in case.

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A0493

Image of WWII BOMB AIMERS CLINOMETER, 1943

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WWII BOMB AIMERS CLINOMETER, 1943

Used with Artillery Gun observer to set the level of arc for the shell each time before firing.

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A0491

Image of WWII ENTRENCHING  KIT, HEAD (SPADE) AND HELVE

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WWII ENTRENCHING KIT, HEAD (SPADE) AND HELVE

Soldiers Trenching Spade and Helve (handle) with pocket for his Webbing Gear.
The Helve has an attachment on it for a No4 Mk2 Spike Bayonet that was normally used on the No4 Lee Enfield Rifle during WW2 and after. Turning the tool into a weapon or Mine prodder.

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A0494

Image of WWII  Swedish ARMY MAP CASE, 1940's

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WWII Swedish ARMY MAP CASE, 1940's

Swedish Army Officers Map folder containing undated German map probably 1940's

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A0792

Image of WWII US ARMY 'CRICKETS'

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WWII US ARMY 'CRICKETS'

A copy of the original Clicking 'Crickets' which were used by the Americans during the Normandy Landings,(D Day) as a means of identifying themselves if separated from their Company, especially in the dark.

These were reproduced and sold in France as a memento to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D Day Landings.

They can be seen in use in the film "The Longest Day"

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A0768

Image of WWII SOLDIERS FOOT POWDER, 1940

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WWII SOLDIERS FOOT POWDER, 1940

Medicated foot powder in shaker tin, used to treat blisters and other minor foot ailments.

It should be noted that the same tin and contents were used in The Great War.

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A0486

Image of WWII BARREL INSPECTION FOR LEE ENFIELD RIFLE

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WWII BARREL INSPECTION FOR LEE ENFIELD RIFLE

Tool used by N.C.O's for inspecting soldiers Rifle Barrels after cleaning, it has a small mirror inside a gap at one end of the tube, and the other end is put down the breech or muzzle of the gun, providing there is enough light around, the viewer can see the condition of the inside of the barrel.

See Item A0550

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A0499

Image of WWII ROYAL MARINES HAVERSACK

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WWII ROYAL MARINES HAVERSACK

Royal Marines Ruck Sack issued to the Commando Brigade and Marines when on foot.

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A0776

Image of WW1 GERMAN  KNAPSACK, 1895

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WW1 GERMAN KNAPSACK, 1895

A simplified version of the 1895 Knapsack. It was made in grey canvas and accommodated reserve rations and a change of clothing.
On the top are leather straps for fixing the 1892 tent section which would be rolled round the edge of the pack. On the flap are more straps for holding a mess tin.
Only the back of the sack is covered with cow hide, earlier packs had both sides covered the front and the back, economies during the end of the war meant the loss of one side, at least the soldiers back would be kept warm, unlike the British who did not seem so concerned about a soldiers comfort.

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A0369

Image of WW1 GERMAN CARTRIDGE POUCHES, 1909

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WW1 GERMAN CARTRIDGE POUCHES, 1909

1909 Cartridge pouches in Brown Leather.

Each of six pouches in two sets of three holds four five round clips of 7.92mm cartridges, a total of 120 rounds.
The weight is held even by means of a ring at the rear of each triple pouch, hooking onto the Knapsack brace belt. See Item A0369

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A0371

Image of WW1  BRITISH WATER BOTTLE

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WW1 BRITISH WATER BOTTLE

Part of an earlier equipment system used before WW1, and not part of the 1908 web set.
Left over from a 1903 pattern and could have been used during WW1 to boost volume.
The water bottle has a Khaki Felt cover over a blue Enamelled container. The water bottle is the original WW1 pattern but is of post war manufacture, hence its condition. As for the sling this is a modern copy, with a date of 1905.
See Item A0994

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A0402

Image of WW1 BRITISH   WIRE CUTTERS, 1917

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WW1 BRITISH WIRE CUTTERS, 1917

Worn by front line troops who often encountered barbed wire in the advance.

Using these tools under fire would have been sheer suicide, crouching with no means of defence trying to cut your way through many yards of thick barbed wire was not an ideal situation for a method of attack.

Help was at hand when the first Tanks were used to cut through the barbed wire.

See Item A0994

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A0403

Image of WW1 BRITISH ENTRENCHING HELVE AND HEAD (SPADE), 1914

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WW1 BRITISH ENTRENCHING HELVE AND HEAD (SPADE), 1914

Part of the standard equipment issued during WW1.
All soldiers were expected and trained to dig trenches using this tool. Using a mattock which is similar to this tool is much easier than a spade especially in hard ground

See Item A0994

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A0404

Image of WW1 GERMAN  TIN MUG

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WW1 GERMAN TIN MUG

Tin mug of the type taken into the theatre of war by German infantry during the end of WW1, and replaced an earlier Aluminium mug.

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A0366

Image of WW1 GERMAN BREAD BAG, 1887

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WW1 GERMAN BREAD BAG, 1887

Part of German soldiers equipment and attached to leather belt or on a leather shoulder strap during WW1

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A0367

Image of WW1 SCREW PIQUET

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WW1 SCREW PIQUET

Stake used to secure barbed wire defence lines during WW1 these could be 100yards deep and stretch for miles making it almost impossible for the infantry to breech.

Tanks were primarily invented just to forge these and other barriers, but before the tank, bombs were specifically designed to blow the wire apart but were not very successful.

Usually screwed into the ground this one is in a pot of concrete for display purposes.

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A0348

Image of WW1 BRITISH  WIRE CUTTERS, 1917

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WW1 BRITISH WIRE CUTTERS, 1917

Fitted to a Short Magazine Lee Enfield Rifle, the operator would lung forward onto a fence or wire that is reasonably secured, and lift the rifle upwards, the jaws of the cutter would close cutting the wire.

This would only be successful if the wire was taut or fixed in some way, as the unit will not work if the wire is allowed to move upwards.

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A1127

Image of WWII BRITISH JERRYCAN (JERRICAN), 1945

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WWII BRITISH JERRYCAN (JERRICAN), 1945

Invented by the Germans before WW2 who called it the 'Wehrmachtskanister'.
Also known as a Journey Can, J.E.R.I. (Journey Extension Refillable Item).

The design was copied around the world and picked up by the British and Americans during WW2 because of its superior design.

Called a Jerrycan because the idea was copied from cans stolen from the Germans (Jerrys). It had an efficient spout and sides that could expand and contract under different conditions, with three handles so it could handled fast and efficiently.
Holding 20 Litres of fuel or water as the insides were lined with plastic.

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A0344

Image of WWII KIT BAG MARKED W AMBROSE

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WWII KIT BAG MARKED W AMBROSE

John Ambrose donated this, along with among many other items.

It belonged to his father W.Ambrose, and it appears it was used on his homeward trip after being wounded during WW2.

See Items A0840 to A0847. and A1027 and A1080.

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A0837

Image of WWII CANVAS FOLDING BASIN

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WWII CANVAS FOLDING BASIN

Portable wash basin for mobile troops.

It even has a place for the soap.

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A0795

Image of WWII CANVAS FOLDING  CHAIR

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WWII CANVAS FOLDING CHAIR

Canvas folding chair for mobile troops which can be folded into a small bundle.

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A0796

Image of WWII LOG BOOK

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WWII LOG BOOK

British Army Log book in folder with standard message pad.

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A0797

Image of GERMAN ARMY MESS TINS , 1970's

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GERMAN ARMY MESS TINS , 1970's

Mess tins manufactured in Sweden between the late 1960's and the 1990's, this one is dated 1969.

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A0775

Image of WWII BATTERIES IN TIN

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WWII BATTERIES IN TIN

Sending batteries across the Atlantic Ocean from the USA meant that during storage if acid was present deterioration would occur, putting them in this tin solved the problem.
Acid was supplied separately and put into the units with a hypodermic needle, after the can had been opened.

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A0479

Image of WWII SILK MAP

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WWII SILK MAP


Silk maps were one of the most ingenious ideas of the Second World War. During WWII, thousands of maps were produced by the British on silk, thin cloth and tissue paper.

A serviceman captured or shot down in enemy territory should have the map to help avoid capture or find his way to safety.
Silk maps were issued specially to airmen so that they could sew them into their clothes or wear them around their neck. They could also be concealed in a cigarette packet or in the hollowed-out heal of a boot and, being made of silk, they would not make a rustling sound if the captive was searched.

Producing the maps was a process shrouded in secrecy and it is not possible to know how many maps were made or whether they were used. However, one can assume that they were invaluable as during the course of the war over 35,000 imprisoned men did manage to escape across enemy lines into Allied territory.

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A0412

Image of WWII GERMAN MINE WARNING SIGN

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WWII GERMAN MINE WARNING SIGN

Typical sign to mark mined areas during WW2

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A0358

Image of WW1 GAS RATTLE, 1918

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WW1 GAS RATTLE, 1918

Used in the trenches during WW1 to warn of a 'Gas Attack'.
Also a popular tool for football fans at games to rouse a noise.

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A0420

Image of WW1 BAYONET BATTLEFIELD FIND

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WW1 BAYONET BATTLEFIELD FIND

1907 Model Bayonet found on the WW1 Battlefields in France.

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A0475

Image of WW1 TRENCHING  TOOL BATTLEFIELD FIND

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WW1 TRENCHING TOOL BATTLEFIELD FIND

Item found on the WW1 Battlefields in France, this is a British Soldiers Trenching Tool.

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A0474

Image of WW1 FORK AND SPOON BATTLEFIELD FIND

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WW1 FORK AND SPOON BATTLEFIELD FIND

Found on the Somme area in France at Delville Wood.

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A0748

Image of WW1 SRD RUM JAR

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WW1 SRD RUM JAR

S.R.D. known as 'Rum Jars' but not necessarily so, other possible meanings could be ' Service Reserve Depot' 'Services Rum Diluted' 'Special Red Demerara' 'Standard Rum Diluted' 'Service Rum Distribution' 'Service Ration Department' 'Service Rum Department'.

Soldiers Slang for it was 'Seldom Rarely Delivered' 'Soldiers Run Dry' 'Soon Runs Out' 'Seldom Reaches Destination'. One thing is certain, soldiers during the First War did get a rum ration usually before ''going over the top''.

Introduced in the winter of 1914 as a remedy for the cold, or to give some ''Dutch courage'' before fighting, it is strange that this was done, as it certainly would not help with the cold or bad weather conditions, and given the amount in the ration, it would take more than the whole bottle to get any man willing to face the German machine gunners.
The handle on this Jar has probably been added at a later date.

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A0399

Image of WWII PRISONER OF WAR BLOWER

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WWII PRISONER OF WAR BLOWER

Developed by prisoners in German camps during World War 2, and used whilst being evacuated from occupied territories after the Normandy landings.

To produce enough heat to boil water the prisoners used tea from their Red Cross parcels, and dried twigs or other material, ignited in the empty clay lined Klim milk tin. Inside the tin with the handle is a crude fan; turning the handle forced air onto the flame exactly like a Blacksmiths Forge.

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A0507

Image of WWII MINE DETECTOR 4A, 1942

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WWII MINE DETECTOR 4A, 1942

Lt. Jozef Kozacki, designed the first practical electronic mine-detector called the Mine Detector Polish Mark 1.
It was soon mass-produced and 500 were issued to the British Army in time for use prior to the Battle of El Alamein in October, 1942.

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A0512


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