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A Short History of the Gramophone

A Short History of the Gramophone

A Brief History of Wireless

A Brief History of Wireless


Image of SHARP MZ 100 PC, 1980's

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SHARP MZ 100 PC, 1980's

An early example of a Personal Computer. It used a domestic television as a display. The program was supplied on a cassette tape run on an internal tape player.

Donated by Geoff Robinson

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A0954

Image of PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR TI59 AND PC-100c PRINTER, 1970's

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PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR TI59 AND PC-100c PRINTER, 1970's

The TI-59 was an early programmable calculator, manufactured by Texas Instruments from 1977. It was the successor to the TI SR-52, quadrupling the number of "program steps" of storage, and adding "ROM Program Modules" (an insert-able ROM chip, capable of holding 5000 program steps.) It was one of the first LED calculators. Also available for the TI-59 was a thermal printer (the PC100C); the calculator was mounted on top of the printer. It could print out a hard copy of the calculator's program, where the instructions were listed with the same alphanumeric mnemonics as the keys , not just the numeric key codes.

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A1459

Image of HEWLETT PACKARD POCKET PC, 1970's

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HEWLETT PACKARD POCKET PC, 1970's

Pocket sized personal computer, supplied by Zengrange Ltd Leeds, England

Donated by Allen Robert

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A1024

Image of EPSON HX20 LAPTOP COMPUTER, 1982

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EPSON HX20 LAPTOP COMPUTER, 1982

The Epson HX-20 (also known as the HC-20) is generally regarded as the first laptop computer, announced in November 1981, although first sold widely in 1983. Full-size keyboard, an LCD screen, printer, tape storage device, built-in rechargeable batteries. Microsoft BASIC is also included in ROM. Price in 1982 US$795. CPU=Two Hitachi 6301 @ 0.614MHz. Ram 16K, 32K max

Nortell Collection

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A1385

Image of AMSTRAD PC9512 COMPUTER, 1991

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AMSTRAD PC9512 COMPUTER, 1991

Replaced the PC8152. which in turn superseded the PCW8256 (Personal Computer Word Processor). Released in 1985. The company Amstrad was launched by Alan Sugar in 1968.

Donated by Dr Richard Grayson

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A1562

Image of COMMODORE PET 8296 DISK DRIVE AND PRINTER, 1984

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COMMODORE PET 8296 DISK DRIVE AND PRINTER, 1984

The last of the Pet series this one made in western Germany in 1984 The final version of what could be thought of as the "classic" PET was the PET 4000 series.

This was essentially the later model 2000 series, but with a larger black-and-green monitor and a newer version of Commodore's BASIC programming language.

By this point Commodore had noticed that many customers were buying the "low memory" versions of the machines and installing their own RAM chips, so the 4008 and 4016 had the sockets punched out of the motherboard.

Donated by Geoff Robinson

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A0937

Image of SINCLAIR ZX81 PERSONAL COMPUTER, 1981

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SINCLAIR ZX81 PERSONAL COMPUTER, 1981

Successor to Sinclair's ZX80, 1.5 million units were sold before it was discontinued. Programs and data were loaded and saved onto audiotape cassettes; The ZX81 could be bought by mail order in kit form or pre-assembled. It came with 1 Kb of on-board memory, QWERTY keyboard layout, and an optional a 16 Kb RAM pack shown in the picture. The owner supplied a TV and cassette recorder.

Donated by L.G.Bray

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A1524

Image of SINCLAIR  SPECTRUM PERSONNAL COMPUTER, 1982

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SINCLAIR SPECTRUM PERSONNAL COMPUTER, 1982

The original ZX Spectrum with rubber keyboard, being small in size and with a rainbow motif. Originally released in 1982 with 16 KB of RAM for £125 Sterling or with 48 KB for £175; these prices were later reduced to £99 and £129 respectively. Owners of the 16 KB model could purchase an internal 32 KB RAM upgrade. Shown with printer, Micro drive, tape-loop cartridge storage device, and an Interface, with RS232 port, the owner provided a colour TV and Cassette recorder, for program storage.

Donated by L.G.Bray

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A1523

Image of URANIUM GLASS CANDLESTICK, 1930's

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URANIUM GLASS CANDLESTICK, 1930's

The term uranium glass, to the collector, will always be associated with that oily, yellow-green, transparent medium known as Vaseline glass.

The chemistry textbooks tell us that uranium was discovered by the German chemist, Martin Heinrich Klaproth, in 1789, although this may not be the whole story. The element was named after the planet Uranus and what Klaproth reported to the Royal Prussian Academy of Science in that year was uranium oxide, which he had separated from the heavy, black mineral known as pitchblende. The element itself was not isolated until 1841, but this did not stop it from being used in glass-making. Items made using such elements mainly for the colouration have a unique trait, they glow under Ultra Violet light, they are not however usually very Radio Active, this one is unmeasured, as it is too weak. Uranium glass can still be purchased today because of its unique colour.

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A1454

Image of ELECTRIC TRAVELLING IRON, 1930's

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ELECTRIC TRAVELLING IRON, 1930's

Electric Travelling Iron, the first design that became very popular.
Wall sockets were rare before WW2, sometimes only one would be in the house, and often none at all, even if you were lucky enough to have Electricity, the lead for this Iron was usually plugged into the lamp bulb holder hung from the ceiling.
It also has no safety earth connection.


Bruce Hammond Collection

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A0352

Image of VOLTA ELECTRIC IRON, 1930's

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VOLTA ELECTRIC IRON, 1930's

Early Volta electric Iron.
This one comes complete with a stand

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1212

Image of ELECTRIC IRON, 1930's

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ELECTRIC IRON, 1930's

Early Electric Iron.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1213

Image of SERVANTS CALL BOX, 1930's

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SERVANTS CALL BOX, 1930's

Servants call system on demonstration board, flaps on the indicator panel (annunciator) moves from side to side when called as the bell rings, and are marked to indicate caller.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1166

Image of HOOVER 750, 1930's

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HOOVER 750, 1930's

First Hoover with famous 'beats-as-it-sweeps -as-it-cleans' motor-driven agitator/brush unit, also the first with a polished aluminium body, it replaced the Hoover model 541. It has a switch integral with the black steel handle and an orange triangular badge. Replaced by 1930 Hoover model 725 with snap-action handle and orange motor band. Basis for standard large Hoover upright until 1936 and continuing in modified form up to 1939.


Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1160

Image of STYLOPHONE, 1967

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STYLOPHONE, 1967

The Stylophone is a miniature stylus operated synthesizer invented in 1967 by Brian Jarvis. It consists of a metal keyboard played by touching it with a stylus. Three million Stylophone's were sold, mostly as children's toys, Rolf Harris appeared for several years as the Stylophone's advertising spokesman in the United Kingdom. The Stylophone was available in three variants: standard, bass and treble, the standard one being by far the most common.

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A1287

Image of 'LITBADGE' AN ILLUMINATED BADGE, 1937

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'LITBADGE' AN ILLUMINATED BADGE, 1937

An illuminated badge to celebrate the coronation of George VI in 1937.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1261

Image of PIFCO ELECTRIC TIE PRESS, 1955

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PIFCO ELECTRIC TIE PRESS, 1955

Slide the tie down the blade and plug the unit in.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1262

Image of PIFCO ELECTRIC TROUSER PRESS, 1950's

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PIFCO ELECTRIC TROUSER PRESS, 1950's

A press for the seams of trousers. Once heated the blades are opened and sandwiched over the crease then moved along the length of the legs.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1266

Image of BAKELITE ELECTRIC WATER BOTTLE, 1943

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BAKELITE ELECTRIC WATER BOTTLE, 1943

Although shaped like a standard rubber hot water bottle, no water is needed. Just slip into the bed and plug in.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1242

Image of OZONE AIR FAN AND GENERATOR, 1930's

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OZONE AIR FAN AND GENERATOR, 1930's

Ozone generator with an electric fan mounted on the top.

Devices generating high levels of ozone, some of which use ionization, are used to sanitize and deodorize uninhabited buildings, rooms, ductwork, woodsheds, boats and other vehicles.

Bruce Hammond Collection

For more information see item A1200

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A1211

Image of TWO BED WARMERS, 1940's

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TWO BED WARMERS, 1940's

One made of porcelain one made of Bakelite, simply electric water bottles (without the water), no regulation and fairly low power. Sold before electric blankets were available.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1171

Image of FULLY AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC CLOTHES BRUSH, 1950's

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FULLY AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC CLOTHES BRUSH, 1950's

Gadgets like this were common after the War, this claimed to clean clothes on the wearer better than an ordinary brush.

It consists of a fan and a small bag for catching anything that it could suck up. In reality it was no better than an ordinary clothes brush.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1170

Image of LAZY DAISY BELL & CALL BUTTON, 1940's

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LAZY DAISY BELL & CALL BUTTON, 1940's

Used as a portable housemaid calling system.

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A0118

Image of STEWARD 'STICK' VACUUM CLEANER, 1936

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STEWARD 'STICK' VACUUM CLEANER, 1936

A small vacuum cleaner dated 1936

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1158

Image of BUSTLER (STICK) VACUUM CLEANER, 1930

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BUSTLER (STICK) VACUUM CLEANER, 1930

The 'stick' upright cleaner was a popular format in the 20's and 30's. It was cheaper and lighter, though lower-powered, that larger cleaners. The 'Bustler' was a popular British model which was available well into the 1950s.

Best described as an 'electric broom', the motor, fan chamber and bag were all mounted on the handle, with only the nozzle in contact with the floor.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1159

Image of ULTRAZONE OZONE GENERATOR, 1922

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ULTRAZONE OZONE GENERATOR, 1922

Devices generating high levels of ozone, some of which use ionization, are used to sanitize and deodorize uninhabited buildings, rooms, ductwork, woodsheds, boats and other vehicles.

In the U.S., air purifiers emitting lower levels of ozone have been sold. This kind of air purifier is sometimes claimed to imitate nature's way of purifying the air without filters and to sanitize both it and household surfaces. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has declared that there is "evidence to show that at concentrations that do not exceed public health standards, ozone is not effective at removing many odour-causing chemicals or "viruses, bacteria, mould, or other biological pollutants." Furthermore, its report states that "results of some controlled studies show that concentrations of ozone considerably higher than these [human safety] standards are possible even when a user follows the manufacturer’s operating instructions."

The US government successfully sued one company in 1995, ordering it to stop repeating health claims without supporting scientific studies, if that is the case we think it should be classed as Quackery.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1200

Image of ELECTRIC FIRE, 1908

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ELECTRIC FIRE, 1908

One of the very first electric fires. The lamps were made by Osram. With spare lamp. The Spare is made by Robertson.

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A0917

Image of TRICITY 'SUN RAY' LAMP HEATER, 1927

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TRICITY 'SUN RAY' LAMP HEATER, 1927

An electric fire that depended on the Infra-red output of a special light bulb.

The lamp produced both light and heat, and was designed as a standard occasional table lamp with a black painted copper base. Copper light diffusers concealed a 200 volt sausage-shaped Dowsing bulb.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1267

Image of ELECTRIC BOWL FIRE, 1930's

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ELECTRIC BOWL FIRE, 1930's

Electric fire used between the Wars and afterwards, operating from 240-250 volt AC mains.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1240


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