Home:   Receiving

Please Note: Not all of the objects on this website are on display at the museum.

Editorial Consultant: Rod Burman

A Brief History of Valves

A Brief History of Valves

A Brief History of the Transistor

A Brief History of the Transistor


Image of V24 MOV VALVE, 1916

Larger image

V24 MOV VALVE, 1916

Valve designed by H.J.Round (Captain) . A high frequency amplifying Triode of 1916 still being used in 1937.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0627

Image of D43 MARCONI VALVE, 1938

Larger image

D43 MARCONI VALVE, 1938

Marconi D43 single Diode Valve of 1938.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0611

Image of WECO VALVE, 1920's

Larger image

WECO VALVE, 1920's

Called the Weco (Western Electric Company) or Peanut Valve. Mullard also produced this valve. Ideal for battery equipment with a nominal 1Volt quarter amp heater, and only 17-45 volts anode.

Introduced by the Western Electric Company in 1919 and developed originally by Hendrik Johannes Van der Bijl as the 215A

The Mullard version complete with 4 pin adapter was advertised in The Meccano Magazine in 1924 for 30 shillings.

View 2 comments about this object

A0614

Image of WESTERN ELECTRIC WECO VALVE, 1921

Larger image

WESTERN ELECTRIC WECO VALVE, 1921

Made in Britain from the American version with a British 4 pin base.
Also made by B.T.H.Co. and called the Weco Valve. Mullard also produced this valve. Ideal for battery equipment with a nominal 1Volt quarter amp heater, and only 17-45 volts anode.

Introduced by the Western Electric Company in 1919 and developed originally by Hendrik Johannes Van der Bijl as the 215A

View 1 comment about this object

A0861

Image of MULLARD EE50 VALVE, 1939

Larger image

MULLARD EE50 VALVE, 1939

Unique valve made by Mullard in 1939, which was never fully produced , no known equipment ever used it.
This sample was found in a cellar at a Radio/TV manufacturer (Bush), probably engineering sample.
The base is a locking type with bent pins to 90 degrees.

Donated by Ray Whitcombe

View 2 comments about this object

A0993

Image of MICROMESH  PENTODE, PEN B1., 1930's

Larger image

MICROMESH PENTODE, PEN B1., 1930's

Standard Telephones and Cables stopped trading their Micromesh range of valves around 1935, This is an indirectly heated Pentode Type PEN B1 output valve, designed for use in battery sets. It has a 2 volt 0.2 amp heater, with a very low HT drain.


Nortel Collection

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A1302

Image of OSRAM HL410 VALVE, 1928

Larger image

OSRAM HL410 VALVE, 1928

Osram HL410 was a Battery dull emitter with a 4 volt heater of 1928.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0633

Image of PHILIPS 'Q'  VALVE, 1921

Larger image

PHILIPS 'Q' VALVE, 1921

The Philips 'Q' was a space-charge-grid Tetrode, the base had a terminal on the side for the inner grid. With a bright-emitter filament 3.5volts.

Nortel Collection

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A1306

Image of 'R' VALVE, BBC MARKING AND BASE, 1923

Larger image

'R' VALVE, BBC MARKING AND BASE, 1923

The 'R' Valve was developed from the French hard vacuum valve of WW1 and was made in the UK from 1916 by the Marconi Osram Valve Company. Its use in new equipment declined in 1925 with the introduction of the lower power dull emitter valves.

The first ever broadcast from Savoy Hill in 1923 used these valves in the audio amplifier. This was the first UK Hard Vacuum valve to go into production, historically so important that a company in Europe started making copies for enthusiasts who wished to make early wireless sets work.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0770

Image of MYERS RAC3 2 VOLT VALVE, 1922

Larger image

MYERS RAC3 2 VOLT VALVE, 1922

Elmer B Myers one of the directors and chief engineers, designed and marketed the RAC3 Audion aiming for the business of the amateur operator rather than the broadcast trade.
This tube was first advertised in December 1920.
It is a Triode with a 4 volt filament.
Made by the Canadian company, E.B.Myers, of Montreal.

View 1 comment about this object

A0641

Image of THORPE K4, 1927

Larger image

THORPE K4, 1927

Helix wound anode valve. The Thorpe K4 was a tetrode of the space charge grid type. It was intended primarily for use in the Unidyne or Solodyne circuits which were popular at that time.
The advantage of this valve was that no separate anode voltage supply was required, as both anode and inner grid were fed from the 6 volt filament battery. In the period 1925-1927 the K4 valve was offered for sale by at least three vendors in London, but although distributed by Bower Electric Ltd was not advertised by them.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0598

Image of LOEWE 3NF VALVE, 1929

Larger image

LOEWE 3NF VALVE, 1929

3 x triodes, Cathode 4V- anode 90V.
One of the most fascinating valves you will ever see, the Loewe 3NF incorporates three triodes, two capacitors and four resistors in a single glass envelope. The inclusion of the passive components reduced the number of pins required to six, but to avoid them contaminating the vacuum, they are each sealed inside a glass tube.

One of the reasons for the development of this amazing device was that in Germany, there was a tax on receivers based on the number of valves in the set, so in 1926, Loewe Radio A.G introduced the 3NF, and also another multi-valve, the 2HF, which contained two screen-grid tetrodes, two resistors and a capacitor, intended for use as a two-stage RF amplifier.
The original Loewe multi-valves are masterpieces of glass work, which must have been very expensive to manufacture, so later versions used a mica supports, and the glass was given an aluminium outer coating to hide the less elegant internal structure.
An obvious drawback of putting three valves in a single envelope is that if one filament fails, the whole device becomes useless, but to counter this disadvantage, Loewe offered a repair service to replace failed filaments.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0601

Image of ARCTURUS No 127, 1929

Larger image

ARCTURUS No 127, 1929

Triode, indirectly heated, with 5 pin Base.
The blue colour was used as a trade mark of the Arcturus Radio Tube Company.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0600

Image of SIEMENS AND HALSKE OR VALVE, 1922

Larger image

SIEMENS AND HALSKE OR VALVE, 1922

Tetrode of 1922 made in Germany by Siemens and Halske.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0602

Image of MULLARD ORA VALVE, 1923

Larger image

MULLARD ORA VALVE, 1923

The Mullard ORA Valve of 1923.
The title means Oscillates Rectifies Amplifies.
The three possible main functions of the valve.

Maker known then as the Mullard Wireless Service Company Ltd

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0603

Image of LS3 MOV VALVE, 1920's

Larger image

LS3 MOV VALVE, 1920's

The Broadcast station 2LO was listened to by receivers using this valve, known as a loudspeaker valve replacing the need for headphones and speaker horns on crystal receivers. (Loud Speaker valve No3).

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0624

Image of CUNNINGHAM AUDIOTRON VALVE, 1915

Larger image

CUNNINGHAM AUDIOTRON VALVE, 1915

The Cunningham Audiotron, used as a detector amplifier.
Launched in 1915 in competition with DeForests Audion Valve.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0628

Image of DEV MOV VALVE, 1925

Larger image

DEV MOV VALVE, 1925

The Marconi Osram Valve Companies DEV Triode Valve of 1925, with dull emitter filament. See Item A0630.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0626

Image of P2 COSSOR VALVE, 1929

Larger image

P2 COSSOR VALVE, 1929

Cossor P2 Directly heated battery valve, with Helmet anode.
High Frequency amplifier of 1929.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0616

Image of DER MOV MARCONI VALVE, 1922

Larger image

DER MOV MARCONI VALVE, 1922

First Dull Emitter valve with a 2 volt heater of 1922. (DER Dull Emitter Receiver) This was a Derivative of the 'R' type with a thoriated tungsten filament of 0.63 Watts ( 1.8 volts 0.35 amps ) which reduced filament power by a factor of 4.
Developed 1st by the Marconi Osram Valve Company.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0630

Image of S625 MOV VALVE, 1927

Larger image

S625 MOV VALVE, 1927

Developed by H.J.Round (Captain) for the Marconi Osram Valve Company.
The S625 was one of the worlds first fully screened RF amplifier valve.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0632

Image of S215 MOV VALVE, 1928

Larger image

S215 MOV VALVE, 1928

The Marconi Osram Valve Company developed the S215 in 1928.
It was a 2 volt filament screened RF Tetrode, and was the upright version of the S625 See Item A0632.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0634

Image of MH4 MOV CATKIN VALVE, 1932

Larger image

MH4 MOV CATKIN VALVE, 1932

The Marconi Osram Valve Company developed the MH4. An indirectly heated Triode, that became the general purpose valve for set makers in the 30's. And was the worlds first all metal valve, the case of this valve (Anode) carried the full HT voltage. See Item A0638 for a Catkin with a cover.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0637

Image of MS4B MOV CATKIN VALVE, 1933

Larger image

MS4B MOV CATKIN VALVE, 1933

The Marconi Osram Valve Company Nicknamed this shape as a 'Catkin' A miniature cooled anode tetrode, the idea was to dissipate as much heat as possible from the anode to the air. Inside the can was a metal envelope that was in fact the anode itself, the can was added to prevent the user getting a shock from the anode. This valve is a screened RF Tetrode Frequency Changer.
See Item A0637 for an earlier version.

Be the first to write a comment about this object

A0638


Back to top

2007 The Museum of Technology, The Great War and WWII
Company registered in England No. 7452160, Registered Charity No. 1140352, Accredited Museum No. 2221