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CRYSTAL TO CRYSTAL DETECTOR, 1930's

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CRYSTAL TO CRYSTAL DETECTOR, 1930's

Detecting or Demodulating the wireless waves in the early days always seemed to be an enigma, eventually the thermionic diode proved a commercial solution, but much work was to be done with other devices, such as crystals such as Galena (Lead Sulphide) with a simple wire known as a ''Cats Whisker'' touching the surface, this was the forerunner to the Germanium Diode, which replaced many of these devices. See A1432 and A1435. Many attempts were made to create a junction between two different crystals as in this case, like the catís whisker method the junction is moveable, giving the impression that better reception can be found by touching the right spot. The type of crystal used in this case is unknown, Tellurium and Zincite (Perikon) is one such possibility, but many more were tried. Crystal receivers were to become popular alternatives to expensive valve sets in the 1920's and the ordinary working man would make his own set at home, creating a popular pastime.

Bruce Hammond Collection

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A1494



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