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CAMBRIDGE UNIPIVOT GALVANOMETER, 1920's

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CAMBRIDGE UNIPIVOT GALVANOMETER, 1920's

Based on Jacques Arsène D'Arsonval's moving coil galvanometer, manufactured on a large scale by the Weston Electrical Instrument Company of Newark, New Jersey, Robert William Paul (1869-l943) devised an instrument in which the moving parts were supported on a single bearing giving lower friction and therefore greater sensitivity. Other unipivot instruments followed. His instruments gained international recognition, winning gold medals at the 1904 St Louis Exposition and the 1910 Brussels Exhibition. In November 1919, his business was bought by the Cambridge Scientific Instrument Company, which was renamed "The Cambridge and Paul Instrument Company." Cambridge Scientific Instrument Company was a company founded in 1881 by Horace Darwin (1851-1928) and Albert George Dew-Smith (1848-1903) to manufacture scientific instruments. Their partnership became a Limited Liability Company in 1895. In 1920 it took over the R.W. Paul Instrument Company of London, and became The Cambridge and Paul Instrument Company Ltd. The name was shortened to the Cambridge Instrument Company Ltd. in 1924 when it was converted to a Public limited company. The company was finally taken over by the George Kent Group in 1968, forming the largest independent British manufacturer of industrial instruments.

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